When an elderly family member needs help with daily activities and care, it is common for a loved one to step in and provide that care. Taking on such a responsibility can be a major sacrifice for the caregiver as it can take up much of the individual’s time and possibly even personal finances. However, taking care of a family member does not automatically mean that a person is entitled to more of the estate after the loved one’s passing. If the caregiver takes steps to get more through deceitful means, estate litigation may be necessary. 

Complex situation 

Nevada readers may be interested in such a scenario involving a childless couple who had numerous nieces and nephews. One of the nieces took on the role of caregiver for her aunt after her uncle died, and since her aunt’s death, that niece inherited approximately $400,000 due to being listed as the sole beneficiary in the will she presented to the court. However, another niece believes that her cousin unjustly changed the will after their uncle’s death, essentially cutting out the other 14 nieces and nephews that were previously named in the will. 

Possible options 

Now, the question hangs as to whether taking legal action is the right course of action. The concerned niece suspects that taking legal action may be feasible because her cousin took unlawful means to change the will. However, she does worry that litigation will be long, difficult and costly, which are valid concerns, and wonders whether her cousin deserves the inheritance since she did provide the majority of care to their aunt. 

Assessing the situation 

The concerns the woman has are certainly worth delving into deeper. After all, moving forward with estate litigation is not an easy task to undertake, so it is wise to feel fully invested in the process before taking action. Because each case is different, if Nevada residents have similar concerns over a changed will, they may want to discuss their specific circumstances with experienced attorneys.